ICELAND

Iceland  is a Nordic island country in the North Atlantic, with a population of 348,580 and an area of 103,000 km2(40,000 sq mi), making it the most sparsely populated country in Europe.The capital and largest city is Reykjavík. Reykjavík and the surrounding areas in the southwest of the country are home to over two-thirds of the population.

Iceland is volcanically and geologically active. The interior consists of a plateau characterised by sand and lava fields, mountains, and glaciers, and many glacial rivers flow to the sea through the lowlands. Iceland is warmed by the Gulf Stream and has a temperate climate, despite a high latitude just outside the Arctic Circle. Its high latitude and marine influence keep summers chilly, with most of the archipelago having a tundra climate.

According to the ancient manuscript Landnámabók, the settlement of Iceland began in 874 AD when the Norwegian chieftain Ingólfr Arnarsonbecame the first permanent settler on the island. In the following centuries, Norwegians, and to a lesser extent other Scandinavians, emigrated to Iceland, bringing with them thralls (i.e., slaves or serfs) of Gaelic origin. The island was governed as an independent commonwealthunder the Althing, one of the world’s oldest functioning legislative assemblies. Following a period of civil strife, Iceland acceded to Norwegian rule in the 13th century. The establishment of the Kalmar Union in 1397 united the kingdoms of Norway, Denmark, and Sweden. Iceland thus followed Norway’s integration to that union and came under Danish rule, after Sweden’s secession from that union in 1523. Although the Danish kingdom introduced Lutheranism forcefully in 1550, Iceland remained a distant semi-colonial territory in which Danish institutions and infrastructures were conspicuous by their absence. In the wake of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars, Iceland’s struggle for independence took form and culminated in independence in 1918 and the founding of a republic in 1944. Until the 20th century, Iceland relied largely on subsistence fishing and agriculture, and was among the poorest countries in Europe. Industrialisation of the fisheries and Marshall Plan aid following World War II brought prosperity, and Iceland became one of the wealthiest and most developed nations in the world. In 1994, it became a part of the European Economic Area, which further diversified the economy into sectors such as finance, biotechnology, and manufacturing.

Iceland has a market economy with relatively low taxes, compared to other OECD countries. It maintains a Nordic social welfare system that provides universal health care and tertiary education for its citizens. Iceland ranks high in economic, political, and social stability and equality. In 2016, it was ranked as the ninth most developed country in the world by the United Nations’ Human Development Index, and it ranks first on the Global Peace Index. Iceland runs almost completely on renewable energy. 

Icelandic culture is founded upon the nation’s Scandinavian heritage. Most Icelanders are descendants of Norse and Gaelic settlers. Icelandic, a North Germanic language, is descended from Old West Norse and is closely related to Faroese and West Norwegian dialects. The country’s cultural heritage includes traditional Icelandic cuisine, Icelandic literature, and medieval sagas. Iceland has the smallest population of any NATO member and is the only one with no standing army, with a lightly armed coast guard in charge of defence

12 THINGS YOU HAVE TO DO IN ICELAND

1– Go on a Whale Watching Tour 
2- Go Horseback Riding 
3– Have a Night Out in Reykjavik 
4– Visit Lake Mývatn in North Iceland
– Relax in the Blue Lagoon Spa
6– See Dettifoss Waterfall in North Iceland
– Visit the West Fjords
8– Enjoy the Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon
9– Have a Dip in a Natural Hot Pool
10 – Do the Golden Circle with Snowmobiling or Snorkelling
11- Witness the Northern Lights
12-  Go Glacier Hiking and Ice Caving
I have never beeen in Iceland but is one of the biggest dreams i have in my life, by the way i can feel is a place who cannot be compare with another one.

Thinks you have to know

Deplar Farm Hotel in Iceland
Courtesy of Eleven Experience

Icelandair and WOW Air, the two Iceland-based carriers, are your best bet for direct and affordable flights to Iceland. WOW Air is known for selling $99 one-way tickets to Iceland from major U.S. hubs, though recently, the fares have dropped to as little as $70. Travelers based in the United States can catch flights from San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Washington, D.C., Miami, New York, and Boston.

For a full-service experience, Icelandair offers travelers complimentary soft drinks, tea, and coffee; a free checked-bag, carry-on, and a personal item; and includes in-flight entertainment. While tickets are more expensive than WOW, the airline has developed a reputation for its free stopover program, which lets you spend up to seven nights free in Iceland. They even offer a Stopover Buddy: a local who will take you to see the country’s greatest hits, free of charge.  

U.S.-based travelers don’t need a visa to visit Iceland, as it’s a part of the Schengen Agreement (a group of 26 European countries with visa and passport-free borders). You will, however, need a passport that’s valid for at least three months after the date of your departure.

Winter, which goes from October through the beginning of March, brings with it short days and lots of precipitation. But despite its name, Iceland doesn’t get unbearably cold. Temperatures will hover around freezing, or 32 degrees Fahrenheit. The lack of daylight can be troublesome (during the solstice, in December, daylight is limited to less than four hours), especially for travelers venturing far away from Reykjavik and the capital’s well-lit streets. But the impermeable darkness also means excellent conditions for viewing the Aurora Borealis, and major savings. Airfare can drop by a third during the off-season, and discounts can be found on lodg ing, food, and activities, too. You’ll also find much thinner crowds at some of the country’s most popular attractions.

Summertime can offer travelers nearly 21 hours of daylight, with the sun rising as early as 2:55 a.m. near the end of June and setting just before midnight. Moderate temperatures, typically in the 50s and 60s, can be enjoyed from May until September. July and August are the peak tourist months. Extra daylight for sightseeing is an obvious draw for Iceland-bound travelers, but visiting in the winter shouldn’t be discounted.

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Icelandair and WOW Air, the two Iceland-based carriers, are your best bet for direct and affordable flights to Iceland. WOW Air is known for selling $99 one-way tickets to Iceland from major U.S. hubs, though recently, the fares have dropped to as little as $70. Travelers based in the United States can catch flights from San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Washington, D.C., Miami, New York, and Boston.

U.S.-based travelers don’t need a visa to visit Iceland, as it’s a part of the Schengen Agreement (a group of 26 European countries with visa and passport-free borders). You will, however, need a passport that’s valid for at least three months after the date of your departure. 

Im thinking at this at this moment many people are craving to pack and go for this beautiful place. But nothing in life is imposible. Go ahead and plan your travel.

Be sure to enjoy it!!!!

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